I scream because I want to be seen

I scream because i want to be seenI scream because I want to be seen

When people with PTSD or BPD become so emotionally overcharged everything losses perspective, the sufferer feels diminished and failing in their attempts to communicate and the volumes of conversations get raised. Most friends or spouses interpret this as screaming, yelling and even abuse…in the  majority of cases, it is really not…these people, locked in side their heads are just trying to be ‘seen’. They feel like they are drowning but they are in a foreign land, they are screaming for help and no one sees or understands them so they increase the volume in proportion to the pain and frustration.

I’m not making excuses, just giving insight.

1 Response
  1. Brittany

    I agree with you that sufferers may intend to communicate through unacceptable ways because they are in pain. I disagree that the majority of cases the screaming, yelling and abuse are “really not”. The sufferer may not be intending to cause harm, but they do. While the screaming, yelling and abuse may be symptoms of pain and suffering, it is still considered emotionally damaging to whomever they are taking their pain out on; and, that’s not right. While I understand that the sufferer may not be aware or in control of his actions and the road to recovery is not easy, he is the only one who can take responsibility to ease his own pain. I have the utmost compassion for those working through emotional pain and trauma, although the aim is to push through and absolve it, not pass it onto others.

Leave a Reply